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Progressive Tense Verbs

Welcome to our Teacher Toolkit Series!
Our topic today is teaching Progressive Tense Verbs!
Here is an idea for an Anchor Chart.
Our students love the pirate theme in our classroom!
So what is a Progressive Tense Verb?
Progressive Tense Verbs describe ongoing actions
in the present, past or future.
Basically, students need to know that they need two elements:
a “to be” verb (am, is, are, was, were, will be)
and an action verb ending in -ing.
We like to create a chart to show which “to be” verb they should use. Whenever students write a progressive verb sentences, we have them use two different color highlighters to code their sentence. They use one color for the “to be” verb and another for the action verb ending in -ing.
We have found this to be a successful tool.
Our students love practicing Progressive Tense Verbs with our Emoji Progressive Verb Activity FREEBIE!
Students love technology and Emojis, so we try to use them whenever we can!
Click below to download this FREEBIE to use in your classroom!
Click the button below to get this Progressive Tense Verb FREEBIE!

IF YOU ENJOY THE FREEBIE, WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU IN THE COMMENTS!
We love teaching with theme and enjoy treating our students when we can. This was a fun treat of just oranges (to prevent scurvy of course) and chocolate treats wrapped in gold. Super easy!
We also love capturing these learning moments with a photo.
Check out this “Make Me Pirate Photo Booth App.”
It’s free and SOOOOO FUN!!!!
If you are looking for a fun way to practice Progressive Tense Verbs in your class, we have Pirate Themed Progressive Tense Verb Task Cards available in our TPT store!
Click here to check them out!
Progressive Tense Verb Task Card Bundle
BE SURE TO ENTER THE RAFFLE BELOW
FOR A CHANCE TO WIN THEM FOR FREE!
 STILL NEED MORE RESOURCES?
Check out our Progressive Tense Verb Week Long Lessons Bundle, or better yet, get the entire year’s worth of Language Standards in our 4th Grade Language and Grammar Interactive Notebook Mega Bundle! See links below!

 

Your First of Many Tools… Relative Adverbs!

Welcome to our first blog post in our series of
“Filling Your Teacher Toolbox!”
Are you ready for your first tool????
*BE SURE TO SEE THE BOTTOM OF THIS POST FOR SOME EXCITING NEWS!*
Your first tool is how to teach RELATIVE ADVERBS
while keeping it simple!
Before we begin, we want to give you a disclaimer. We are very aware that Relative Adverbs can be very detailed, such as relative clauses, prepositions, etc… For the sake of teaching Relative Adverbs to fourth graders, we have simplified the concept to what we consider, appropriate for their developmental level.
With that being said, let’s get started!
We started teaching Relative Adverbs with this bright and beautiful anchor chart. Anchor charts are a great tool for students to reference throughout the unit. We love how it reaches our visual learners!
Here’s a few tips for teaching Relative Adverbs!
Here’s “The Test” for relative adverbs…
Where: Can you plug the words “in which” or “at which”?
      Example: I went to the school where  I attended elementary school.
      Test: I went to the school “at which” I attended elementary school.
      Non example: Where have you been all day?
      Test: “At which” have you been all day
When: Can you plug in the words “on which” or “in which”?
      Example: I like the time of day when my students go home!
      Test: I like the time of day “in which” my students go home!
      Non example: When is it time for lunch?
      Test: “On which” is it time for lunch?
Why: Can you plug in the words “for which” or “the reason”?
      Example: I needed to explain why I was late for work.
      Test: I needed to explain “the reason” I was late for work.
      Non example: Why do you cry all of the time?
      Test: “The reason” do you cry all of the time?
In our experience, we have found that students tend to create relative adverb sentences incorrectly because they use them as the “5 W’s.”

 

Because our Task Cards that we used today were Monster Themed, we thought, let’s go with it! We love a good theme! (One of us more than the other… but anyways…) We started out by making these adorable Monster Ballot Boxes! These monster ballot boxes are a great idea because the task cards required students to write the number of the task card on either Monster A’s eyeball jar, Monster B’s eyeball jar or Monster C’s. Whichever monster had the most eyeballs at the end, won! As students finished, they put their name in the Monster Ballot Box that they thought won. Here’s why this was so amazing… There were 2 students that picked A. The rest picked B (which was correct). I was able to go to the two students that got the wrong answer, find their mistakes and review those task cards with them on a one on one basis. Talk about an easy red flag, right!? I plan on doing more Ballot Boxes in the future!!!! Such an easy tool!
We also made some cute eyeball cookies! The kids loved them!
Not to mention our fun Photo Booth!
KEEP ADDING TO YOUR TOOLKIT BY CHECKING OUT THE PRODUCTS BELOW AT OUR STORE!
Task Cards:
*** In our class, we also used our Week Long Lessons Relative Adverbs Product***
In these products, you will find Students Notes, Practice Pages, Readers’ Notebook Ideas, Sentence Frames, Foldables, Assessments & Answer Keys
*****EXCITING NEWS!!!!! WE ARE HAVING OUR VERY FIRST GIVEAWAY!!!!*****
INTERESTED IN GETTING THESE RELATIVE ADVERB TASK CARDS FOR FREE?????